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Blood test deception (part 4/4)

THANK YOU for taking the time to read the previous three posts in this series. It’s time to pull the information together using some examples and reveal how you can get your blood test assessed using functional ranges so it finally gives you some helpful information to work from! Remember that we offer a customised blood testing service – complete with functional analysis – that we feel is superior to what you’ll receive from the medical system (details are included in this article). Dave Hompes’ blood test result Take a look at my blood test result, below. The small...

Blood test deception (part 3/4)

So far, we’ve looked at the fundamental problems of: Blood tests being very inconsistent in what they report and measure. Normal reference ranges being very wide and based on a sick population. These are incredibly important considerations when you’re told “everything is normal with your blood test” despite you feeling really unwell. Pathological versus functional reference ranges “I feel crap but my blood tests are all normal” is a common sentiment echoing around people’s minds – perhaps yours. How can you feel so wretched and still have super-duper normal blood test results? At first glance, it doesn’t make sense....

Blood test deception (2/4)

In the previous article, we covered the inconsistency of test markers reported despite our clients requesting exactly the same blood test markers. But even when every single marker is reported, there’s an even more fundamental problem with blood test results and it’s the way they’re interpreted. Specifically, it’s the concept of a ‘normal’ range that’s important to explain. As you may have experienced, it’s all too common for folk to go to the doc and get a blood test, only to be told everything is ‘normal’. “Hang on a minute”, you think… “I feel like crap – I’m tired,...

Blood test deception (1/4)

The first major problem with blood testing – especially in the NHS here in Great Britain – is the enormous inconsistency in the specific markers that are tested. When I began analyzing complete blood count/chemistry (CBC) tests I was astonished by the number of markers omitted in my clients’ tests, so much so that I wondered why the word ‘complete’ was used at all! A standard CBC should include the following markers (as a minimum): Red blood cells, haemoglobin, haematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW. White blood cells, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, platelets. A metabolic panel / blood chemistry...